CROMER has a lot to boast about: there’s the museum, the crabs, the pier, the Seaside Special shows at the Pavilion theatre … and, of course, the fact that it’s only 16 miles from Happisburgh.

Cromer

 

Cromer has a lot to boast about: there’s the museum, the crabs, the pier, the Seaside Special shows at the Pavilion theatre … and, of course, the fact that it’s only 16 miles from Happisburgh.

 

Shipden-juxta-Felbrigg was a village separated from the sea by its neighbour, Shipden, whose remains lie buried in the North Sea. By the end of the 14th century, Shipden-juxta-Felbrigg had edged a little closer to the coast and was better known by the name of Cromer, a derivation of crows’ mere, meaning a shallow lake or marsh frequented by crows. In the late 19th century, the Cromer area became popular with tourists, thanks to Clement Scott, the influential journalist from London, who coined the term Poppyland.

 

Cromer pier, in its present form, was built in 1901. In 1905, the original bandstand was converted to an enclosed pavilion, where concert parties were performed. In 1907, the roller-skating craze of the late 1800s was revived, and the rink in Cromer Pier’s pavilion was one of around 500 that opened up in Britain.

 

Cromer Pier is one of only five seaside piers in the UK with a working theatre. For the last 40 years, there’s been a traditional end-of-pier show – now the only one of its kind in the world – at Cromer’s Pavilion Theatre, running this year from June 24 to September 23. It’s not surprising that Cromer Pier has twice been named Pier of the Year by the National Piers Society.

 

If you haven’t seen the 2013 movie, Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa, starring Steve Coogan, then it’s worth watching it just for the copious views of Cromer and neighbouring towns. Throughout the film there are many shots of Cromer town and the pier, as well as a car ‘chase’ through Sheringham.

 

Cromer is perhaps best known internationally for the crabs that thrive on the Cromer chalk reef. For generations, crab fishing has been vital to the local economy, and there are many fishermen in Cromer and Sheringham who were born into fishing families and have been fishermen all their lives. No holiday at Boundary Stables would be complete without at least one crab sandwich – unless you’re allergic to seafood, of course.

 

Cromer is a well-known seaside resort, and many celebrity artists in the media of literature, film, and music have ‘taken the air’ here. And we’ve seen royalty, too. One very famous guest was the Empress Elizabeth of Austria (known as Sisi), wife of Emperor Franz Joseph. Defying the confines of her royal position, Sisi was in the habit of ‘escaping’, and it was in 1887, when she was fifty years old, that she escaped to Cromer and the Lower Tucker’s Hotel, on the promenade. Constantly afraid of assassination, particularly by poisoning, Sisi insisted on eating food that had been prepared under supervision. This is the reason that, during her two-month stay in Cromer, a cow would be milked on the prom, under the Empress’s window! Despite her efforts to avoid assassination, Sisi was murdered in 1898, whilst staying in Geneva.

 

On Facebook

[custom-facebook-feed num=1 showauthor=false exclude=social,likebox]

On Twitter